SunRocket Folds

Predicted by many, VoiP provider SunRocket’s demise today was noted even by the New York Times. So far it appears that it’s every man for himself on the SunRocket Titanic, with management nowhere in sight and the company website still on autopilot.

So what do subscribers do now? It’s no surprise that at least one VoIP provider is looking to help SunRocket customers out.

“We’ve reached out to Sherwood Partners [the consultants handling the SunRocket shut down] today,” says VoicePulse CEO Ravi Sakaria. “We’re able to provide a migration path. We use a lot of the same underlying carriers as SunRocket.”

That means that many SunRocket subscribers can be up and running on VoicePulse VoIP service within 24 hours. Even before today’s dénouement, VoicePulse saw an influx of SunRocket customers, Sakaria reports.

VoicePulse offers an interesting contrast to SunRocket and one that should be of interest to VoIP industry analysts. The privately held New Jersey company has been profitable or at breakeven for the past three years, according to Sakaria.

The company’s recipe is like that of the tortoise of the well-known fable.

“The secret was to not pour a lot of money into marketing, and [aim for] slow and steady growth,” explains Sakaria. “We’ve offered unlimited calling for $24.99 a month for three years and we’ve never varied. That’s the price we needed to charge to be profitable.”

VoicePulse’s strategy has yielded about 40 percent growth year-over-year, every year, according to Sakaria.

“Four years ago when we launched the company we were seeing a 10, 20, 40 year endeavor,” continues Sakaria. “When you do that you have the mentality of how to develop a profitable enterprise and grow it from there.”

When you do this, he explains, you have the resources to reinvest in the business. For example, VoicePulse is getting ready to turn on a new, west coast POP which will deliver better redundancy for customers.

“We’ve been able to do that because of the money we generate,” he says. “Rather than struggling to stay alive, we’re able to bring customers a better calling experience.”

Not that Sakaria wouldn’t like VoicePulse to be a VoIP name brand.

“I would love for VoicePulse to be a better known brand, but not at the expense of operating at a loss. We haven’t figured out how to do that better than we are and still at a profit.”

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  • jfinlayson

    They really know how to keep costs down. I don’t think they added a single feature in the 2+ years we were with them, and their home page hasn’t changed in at least 3 years.

    Not that they need to add any features. They had a full set of features to start with.

  • kfife

    Our company has used a lot of ITSP’s and voicepulse is still one of our favorites. Why? High quality audio. Cheaper ITSP’s sound like cell-phones (or worse) because they are often oversubscribed, (with their internet connections), so you have poor audio even if YOUR internet connection is wide-open.
    This article hits the nail on the head. Cheap but not the cheapest, they’re charging enough money to actually PROVIDE the service they SAY they will provide. As an added bonus they’ll still be around for you tomorrow when your phone rings. I was on the phone with the ViaTalk sales team. The audio quality was so poor I dedided against signup. If they can’t make their own sales calls sound good, how bad will it be for me if I’m pre-paid for two years?! No thanks.

  • riccimathew@gmail.com

    I think Lingo is offering much better services these days than any other in the field. They have fine unlimited calling plans for reasonable rates. Additionally, their calling packages are offered with good promos such as one month free, free shipping, free activation, free equipment, free second phone line, free office assistant and 30 day money back guarantee.

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